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Rules of The Other Club

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RULES OF THE OTHER CLUB

These are the original Rules, though as Sir Colin noted, some have altered. Rule 3 was immediately and frequently violated. As for Rule 6, "the Club is not immune from inflation; and these figures are variable"‹ but imagine what £2, a week's wage for a workingman, bought for dinner in 1911. Rule 7 had the clear purpose of altering no votes between Government and Opposition. Although Rule 11 remains unchanged, there has been no Executive Committee since 1970 and its powers are exercised by the honorary secretaries. The Rules are read aloud at every meeting and graduate Members have long known them by heart:

    1. The Club shall be called the Other Club.

    2. The object of The Other Club is to dine.

    3. The Club shall consist of no more than fifty Members and not more than twenty-four Members of the House of Commons.

    4. So long as this number is not exceeded, any Member may propose a Candidate for election to the Committee, and the Committee may circulate the name of any other Candidate or Candidates (but not singly) to the Club for election at such time as they think fit.

    5. The Club shall dine on alternate Thursdays at 8.15 punctually, when Parliament is in session.

    6. There shall be an entrance fee of £5 and an annual subscription of £7 10s. £2 shall be charged for each dinner.

    7. The Members of the House of Commons shall be paired from 8 o'clock until 10.30 p.m. unless they arrange to the contrary through the co-secretaries.

    8. The Executive Committee shall settle all outstanding questions with plenary powers.

    9. There shall be no appeal from the decision of the Executive Committee.

    10. The names of the Executive Committee shall be wrapped in impenetrable mystery.

    11. The Members of the Executive Committee shall nominate the Secretary, who shall receive no remuneration and shall be liable for all unforeseen obligations.

    12. Nothing in the rules or intercourse of the Club shall interfere with the rancour or asperity of party politics.

The Other Club, by Sir Colin Coote, reviewed in
Finest Hour 101