Finest Hour 135

Interview – Churchill’s Lessons of Leadership

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 60

Interview – Churchill’s Lessons of Leadership

Sir Martin Gilbert “one on one” with Peter Mansbridge Read More >

No Churchill, None of the Time

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 59

No Churchill, None of the Time

From Churchill’s War Rooms: Letters of a Secretary 1943-45, by Joanna Moody. Stroud, Glos. Tempus, 256 pages, hardbound $50, member price $40.

By David Hatter

Mr. Hatter, of Ongar, Essex, is a Chartwell guide, who wrote about the Chartwell Visitors Book in Finest Hour 131. Read More >

Hack Work

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 58

Hack Work

By Christopher H. Sterling

Dark Lady: Winston Churchill’s Mother and Her World, by Charles Higham. New York: Carroll & Graf 250 pp., hardbound, $25.95, member price $20.75. Read More >

Vital Insights to a Key Colleague

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 57

Vital Insights to a Key Colleague

Churchill’s Man of Mystery: Desmond Morton and the World of Intelligence, by Gill Bennett. London, Routledge 372 pages, hardbound, £49.95. Not available from Churchill Centre Book Club. We suggest Amazon UK.

By Paul H. Courtenay Read More >

Heroes of the Air: Archibald Sinclair and Hugh Dowding

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 55

Heroes of the Air: Archibald Sinclair and Hugh Dowding

Winston & Archie: The Letters of Sir Archibald Sinclair and Winston S. Churchill 1915-1960, edited by Ian Hunter. London: Politico’s, 530 pages, hardbound, £30, member price $36.

By Christopher H. STerling Read More >

Books, Arts & Curiosities – Sinking Stone

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 54

Books, Arts & Curiosities – Sinking Stone

Blood, Sweat and Arrogance and the Myths of Churchill’s War, by Gordon Corrigan. Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 496 pages, hardbound £20, member price $45.

By Robert A. Courts Read More >

The Queen and Mr. Churchill

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 50

The Queen and Mr. Churchill

When Churchill, still Prime Minister and nearing the age of eighty, looked upon the Queen’s picture in a newspaper, he murmured “The country is so lucky.” Exactly so; we should be less shy of acknowledging the fact.

By David Dilks

The recent visit of the Queen to America, and subsequent gratuitous references to the quaintness of monarchy by the U.S. media, prompt publication of this address to the Royal Society of St. George, City of London Branch, 6 February 2007. Professor Dilks is the former Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hull, author of The Great Dominion: Winston Churchill in Canada 1900-1954 (reviewed FH 129), and the biographer of Neville Chamberlain. He memorialized Bill Deakin in Finest Hour 131. We are honored to publish such fine writing. —Ed. Read More >

Churchill and the Tank (2): In for the Duration

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 45

Churchill and the Tank (2): In for the Duration

By Marcus Frost

Mr. Frost, of Mexia, Texas, is a Churchill Centre Governor, Trustee and Associate (the only individual who is all three). He is active in both our Dallas and San Antonio affiliates, and sponsored the recent teacher seminar in March at Baylor University. Read More >

Churchill and the Tank (1): Present at the Creation

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 42

Churchill and the Tank (1): Present at the Creation

By David Fletcher

Mr. Fletcher is author of War Cars (1987) and The British Tank 1915-1919 (2001). Photographs were supplied by the author by kind courtesy of the Tank Museum Collection, Bovington Camp, Dorset. Read More >

Myth and Reality – What Did Churchill Really Think About the Jews?

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 40

Myth and Reality – What Did Churchill Really Think About the Jews?

Someone else’s opinions, in an unpublished article which never appeared in print under Churchill’s name, cannot be laid at Churchill’s door.

By Sir Martin Gilbert CBE

Professor Gilbert is official biographer of Winston Churchill, a CC honorary member, and a contributor to Finest Hour. His book, Churchill and the Jews, was published in Britain in June by Simon and Schuster, and will be published in the USA by Holt in October. Read More >

Wit & Wisdom – WSC on Taxation

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 39

Wit & Wisdom – WSC on Taxation

“There is no such thing as a good tax,” Churchill is alleged to have said. But did he say it? Read More >

The Protracted Conflict (2) – Churchill and Lloyd George

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 37

The Protracted Conflict (2) – Churchill and Lloyd George

Political myopia, 1936-1945: Hoping your country will lose.

By James Lancaster Read More >

But Did Britain Fail?

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 34

But Did Britain Fail?

What Britain’s Experience may teach us is that superpowers can only fail voluntarily.

By David Freeman

Professor Freeman (dafreeman@fullerton.edu) is a regular contributor to Finest Hour and his last article was “Midwife to an Ungrateful Volcano: Churchill and the Making of Iraq” in FH 132, Autumn 2006. He teaches History at California State University, Fullerton. Read More >

Correspondence on Iraq, 1922

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 35

Correspondence on Iraq, 1922

By Winston S. Churchill and David Lloyd George

Reprinted by kind permission from the official biography, Winston S. Churchill, Companion Volume IV, Part 3, starting at page 1975. “Wee Free” may refer to the Asquith Liberals, who were “free” of the Lloyd George Coalition. An August 1920 letter along the same lines (“There is something very sinister to my mind in this Mesopotamian entanglement”) was written but not sent; see Companion Volume IV, Part 2 (Heinemann, 1977), 1199. In 1921 Churchill became Colonial Secretary and went to Cairo to settle Middle East boundaries. Read More >

The Protracted Conflict – Failing in Baghdad: The British Did It First

Finest Hour 135, Summer 2007

Page 32

The Protracted Conflict – Failing in Baghdad: The British Did It First

By Toby Dodge

Toby Dodge (t.dodge@qmul.ac.uk) is the author of Inventing Iraq: The Failure of Nation Building and a History Denied (Columbia University Press). He is associate professor of international politics at the University of London and a senior fellow at the International Institute for Strategic Studies. This article, first published in Washington Post Outlook, 25 February 2007, is reprinted by kind permission of the author and The Washington Post.


Here is what Britain’s history of failure at building a democratic state in Iraq in the 1920s and 1930s tells George W. Bush and his successors: If, like Gen. Maude, they fail to deliver on the promises of a better future for the Iraqi people, then Iraq will continue as a font of violent instability long after those who made the promises have been buried.


At the center of Baghdad’s neglected North Gate War Cemetery, near the edge of the old city walls, stands an imposing grave. Sheltered from the weather by a grandiose red sandstone cupola, it is the final resting place of a man from whom George W. Bush could have learned a great deal about the perils of intervening in Iraq.

Read More >

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