David Cameron Asks: ‘What Would Churchill Do?’

David Cameron has said he often looks to Sir Winston Churchill for inspiration on the big issues of the day.

SKY NEWS, 20 April 2011 – Speaking after a rally in Darlington, County Durham, for Conservatives opposing the alternative vote, he said he liked to consider what our “greatest Prime Minister” would have done in certain situations.

“The question of AV came up when he was very active in politics after the First World War and he had some pretty clear things to say.

“He is an inspiring figure, definitely our greatest Prime Minister.”

During a speech to activists, Mr Cameron referred to Churchill’s opposition to AV, quoting him saying: “It is the stupidest, the least scientific, the most unreasonable of all voting systems.”

Mr Cameron asked: “Do you want to argue with Winston?

“I don’t think so.”

He added: “We have 15 days until the elections.

“I know there are a few distractions, there’s the weather and the wedding, but we have to stay focused.”

After the rally, Mr Cameron was approached by young Tory Daniel Dennis, 12, who had donned a Conservative rosette and No to AV sticker for the occasion.

Daniel, whose father Philip is standing in Eaglescliffe, Stockton, Teesside, as a Tory in the local elections, was worried the Tees Valley Music Service, which supports young musicians, might be cut.

Mr Cameron asked for details about the service.

Daniel was asked afterwards if he was brave to tackle the Prime Minister, and he replied: “Sort of, yes.

“(But) I’m desperate for information about it.”

Copyright © Sky News

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