Post-war

Riddles, Mysteries, Enigmas – “Let Europe Arise!”

Finest Hour 173, Summer 2016 Page 50 Seventy years ago at Zurich University Winston Churchill delivered one of his most important post-war speeches (see pages 7, 31, and 41). Although given the somber title “The Tragedy of Europe,” Churchill’s remarks set out a plan for rebuilding the war-torn continent. Proposing “a kind of United States […]

Books, Arts, & Curiosities – Let Europe Arise!

Finest Hour 173, Summer 2016 Page 41 Werner Vogt, Winston Churchill und die Schweiz: Vom Monte Rosa zum Triumphzug durch Zürich,Verlag Neue Zürcher Zeitung, 2015, 231 pages. ISBN 978–3038100867. Review by Jochen Burgtorf Jochen Burgtorf is professor of History and former chair of the History department at California State University, Fullerton. He is currently the […]

Books, Arts, & Curiosities – The Irish Perspective

Finest Hour 173, Summer 2016 Page 39 Paul Bew, Churchill and Ireland, Oxford University Press, 208 pages, £16.99/ $29.95. ISBN 978–0198755210 Review by Robert McNamara Robert McNamara teaches History at Ulster University and is the editor of The Churchills in Ireland 1660– 1965: Connections and Controversies (Irish Academic Press, 2011). What did Winston Churchill really […]

In the Land of Caesars: Churchill and Italy

Finest Hour 173, Summer 2016 Page 16 By Patrizio Romano Giangreco and Andrew Martin Garvey Patrizio Romano Giangreco lives in Italy. He is grateful to Andrew Martin Garvey of the University of Turin and Italian Officers College for assistance in preparing this article. At age nineteen Winston Churchill first set foot in Italy in August […]

Books, Arts & Curiosities – The Men Who Went into the Cold

Finest Hour 170, Fall 2015

Page 40

Review by Alonzo Hamby

Richard Crowder, Aftermath: The Makers of the Postwar World, London and New York: I. B.Tarus, 2015, xii + 308 pages, $35. IBSN 978-1784531027


Postwar WorldMost histories of the early Cold War, especially those written by Americans, give center stage to US statesmen, notably Harry Truman, Dean Acheson, and George Marshall. Richard Crowder, a youngish British diplomat educated at Oxford and Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government, focuses his engagingly readable account on the other side of the Atlantic. His narrative provides equal time to such British figures as Clement Attlee, Ernest Bevin, and Duff Cooper. It also gives more attention to continental European leaders than they customarily receive.

It is significant that a Labour government led Britain into the Cold War with remarkably little internal dissent. Bevin, a former trade union leader with a rudimentary formal education was at first glance an unlikely foreign secretary. He is perhaps too easily caricatured. The author quotes him as telling the eminent career diplomat Gladwyn Jebb, “Must be kinda queer for a chap like you to see a chap like me sitting in a chair like this….Ain’t never ’appened before in ’istory” (120). At times Bevin could be too rough and blunt for his own good— as when, in an incident Mr. Cooper passes over, he accused American leaders of supporting mass Jewish immigration to Palestine because “they did not want too many of them in New York” (quoted in Robert J. Donovan, Conflict and Crisis, 317).
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